PV GRID - NEW SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH PROJECT

Last year Denmark experienced a significant growth in the amount of installed solar power, so the total capacity at the end of 2012 reached approx. 400 MW. Only a few of the plants were installed in companies, despite the fact that they consume a lot of power in the daytime, and potentially the most to gain from solar energy. They often have large roof or facade areas which are ideal for the construction of solar power plants. So why aren't more companies investing in photovoltaics? The Danish project PV GRID will find the answers and solutions.



The project will identify and overcome existing barriers to the use of solar power. First, by demonstrating and disseminating business-specific solutions, which consist of more cost-effective solar systems - and by disseminating tools and knowledge about plant design, engineering and Smart Grid integration to relevant audiences. Finally, the project will identify the impact of having several major plants on our energy infrastructure. Overall, 4 MW solar power plants are expected to be installed by 25-50 companies in West Zealand, to ensure synergy with the ongoing Smart Grid development in Kalundborg.

GXN's role will be to assist with design solutions and the development and communication to encourage investment in solar cells among commercial players on the Danish market.

"We see great potential in the project, which will help create new knowledge and concrete building integrated solutions with high aesthetic quality. The ambition is that investments in solar cells must become more attractive to commercial operators through new products and business models" says director of GXN Kasper Guldager Jørgensen.

The energy efficiency measures undertaken today will not be sufficient to achieve either Denmark or EU targets for energy savings. The project will utilize existing commercial buildings and urban areas for the construction of energy-saving measures, and thus contribute to achieving the necessary savings targets and making Denmark fossil-free in 2035.

2013.04.04

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